Columbia Symposium 2013

Gender-Specific Medicine after the Age of Darwin: Achievements and Challenges for Biomedical Science in the 21st Century Saturday, December 7, 2013 Columbia University

 The Foundation for Gender-Specific Medicine hosted a symposium to discuss the achievements and challenges for Biomedical Science in the 21st Century. We currently stand at an unprecedented point in science and, in effect, in life, as science has made great strides in creating human-animal chimeras, and the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence have rapidly advanced. Each new discovery generates others at a rate that is producing an explosive record of accomplishment. The marriage of biology and technology is creating a revolutionary expansion of humans’ ability to change the nature of life, as we know it. FGSM Director and Founder Dr. Marianne Legato has assembled scientist as well as theologians, ethicists, lawyers, and economist to this informative program, which will serve also as a Continuing Medical Education (CME) symposium for physicians, to discuss how the new sciences in genomics, synthetic biology, chimera, stem cells, and artificial intelligence will significantly change the world. The symposium was held at Columbia University, New York, NY. Each day, scientists expand our ability to decode and manipulate not only gender, but also the genome itself. Researchers can manufacture new species using BioBricks, or chemicals off the shelf. Scientists are also making great strides in creating human-animal chimeras, and the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence have rapidly advanced as well. Each new discovery generates others at a rate that is producing an explosive record of accomplishment. The marriage of biology and technology is creating a revolutionary expansion of humans’ ability to change the nature of life as we know it.The following professionals discussed the ramification of these advancements for their respective field:
 

Symposium Faculty Speakers

The following professionals discussed the ramification of these advancements for their respective field:

Denise Batista, Ph.D.
Genomics
Associate Professor of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University
Member of the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine
Director of the Cytogenetics Laboratory at the Kennedy Krieger Institute
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland
Stephen R. Munzer, J.D.
Chimera & Stem Cell Research
Distinguished Professor of Law
UCLA School of Law
Los Angeles, California

Thomas H. Murray, Ph.D   Synthetic Biology                       Senior Research Scholar and President Emeritus, The Hastings Center

Stan Franklin, Ph.D.
Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
Professor of Computer Science
W. Harry Feinstone Interdisciplinary Research Professor,
Institute for Intelligent Systems
University of Memphis
Memphis, Tennessee

Panelist                                 Justin Killian, J.D.                       Sherif Moussa, J.D.                       Ellen Levee, D.V.M.                 Charles Camosy, Ph.D

Science and technology are evolving at exponential rates. Through introducing the new sciences into the public consciousness, this project has allowed society as a whole to have proper input in matters that surround health and health care. The public has the power to either limit or increase the speeds at which the new sciences develop. The Foundation for Gender Specific-Medicine supports the investigation of the ways in which biological sex and gender affect normal human function and the experience of disease. Their programs support original scientific research in gender-specific medicine, create an evidence-based set of protocols to guide physicians and educate the lay public and the scientific/medical community.

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